Installation Manual for 2.17 on Oracle (and related) Linux

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  1. Under Construction

These instructions cover the installation of WeBWorK 2.17 from scratch onto an Oracle Linux server. These instructions will probably mostly work for related Linux flavors such as RHEL 8.

If you are just upgrading WeBWorK, especially if you already have existing WeBWorK courses, see Upgrading WeBWorK from 2.16 to 2.17.

OS Users

These instructions reference four OS users.

  • You should have a personal account with sudo privileges. These instructions will use "myname" as the name of that user.
  • root
  • apache
  • wwadmin (we will create below)

It can be critical that you act as whatever user these instructions tell you to act as at each step. Do not act as root unless specifically instructed to.

Furthermore, when you will need to act as root, either use sudo su or sudo <command> as the instructions say. In certain places, actually switching users to root with sudo su when a mere sudo someCommand was indicated will result in bad things that will not become apparent until later in the installation.

Notation

Now some comments on notation we will be using. We will use <key> to indicate that you should press a specific key (e.g. <Enter>, <Tab>, <F12>, etc.). Sometimes we will also use e.g. <wwadmin password> to indicate you have to enter the wwadmin password.

  • Code blocks that begin with $ should be run as myname.
  • Code blocks that begin with # should be run as root (via either a root shell or switching users to root with sudo su).
  • Code blocks that begin with @ should be run as wwadmin (for which you can use sudo su wwadmin).

You are not intended to type the $, or #, or @ characters as part of the provided commands.

Assumptions

We assume that you already have Oracle (or a closely related Linix distribution) installed, but that you haven't done much with yet.

We assume that you have a user account myname with sudo privileges.

Install MariaDB

After logging in to your server:

$ sudo yum install mariadb-server mariadb-connector-c mariadb-connector-c-devel